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LEEP awards police academy high achievers

Posted by: Jennifer Gomori Posted date: April 10, 2014


POLC Executive Committee member Tom Wilk presents Macomb Police Academy Cadet James D. Morgan with a LEEP Scholarship Award for highest overall achievement.

POLC Executive Committee member Tom Wilk presents Macomb Police Academy Cadet James D. Morgan with a LEEP Scholarship Award for highest overall achievement.

Two police academy graduates were given $500 Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP) Scholarship Awards for highest overall achievement by a non-sponsored pre-service cadet.

In December 2013, Macomb Community College’s Macomb Police Academy pre-service Officer James D. Morgan and Oakland Community College’s Oakland Police Academy Police Officer Candidate Ryan M. Addis were awarded the scholarships.

“All around (Morgan) was just an excellent cadet so much so that the day that he graduated he was contacted by the Port Huron Police Department and given a conditional offer of employment,” said Charles Craft, Director of Macomb Police Academy. “We were very happy for him. Twenty-two years old is awful young but he was very mature, very focused, and did a great job. That’s why we selected him for that award.”

POLC Executive Committee member Tom Wilk presented the award to Morgan. The LEEP Award is given twice yearly to graduates with the highest overall achievement who have not been sponsored by any police agency. To qualify, the cadets had to pass the Michigan Commission on Law Enforcement Standards (MCOLES) certification test and meet MCOLES employment standards to become certifiable as law enforcement officers in Michigan.

Morgan served as a cadet with the Port Huron Police Department after graduating from Capac High School. “As he was going to school he was really, really drawn to that type of work,” Craft said. “It fits his personality. He’s a very disciplined young guy. Some people really thrive in the environment of being a police officer.”

Morgan obtained his associate’s degree in Criminal Justice from St. Clair County Community College, graduating in June 2013. He graduated from the police academy fourth academically and was one of the highest scoring students in overall achievement based on tests and skills assessments. “He’s one of those students that he just seemed to take to the whole thing,” Craft said. “He understood it well. He fit in quickly. He adjusted to academy protocols.”

In both of these academies, which totaled 70 cadets, only 11 were pre-sponsored by a law enforcement agency, which means their academy tuition was paid by the agency planning to hire them after graduation.

 

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